Radioactive Water From Plant Reaches N.J. Aquifer

LACEY TOWNSHIP, N.J. (AP) — Officials say radioactive water that leaked from the nation's oldest nuclear power plant has reached an aquifer that supplies drinking water to much of southern New Jersey. The state Department of Environmental Protection ordered the Oyster Creek Nuclear Generating Station to deal with the contamination even as it said there is no imminent threat to drinking water.

LACEY TOWNSHIP, N.J. (AP) — Officials say radioactive water that leaked from the nation's oldest nuclear power plant has reached an aquifer that supplies drinking water to much of southern New Jersey.

The state Department of Environmental Protection ordered the Oyster Creek Nuclear Generating Station to deal with the contamination even as it said there is no imminent threat to drinking water.

Officials say the water contaminated with tritium (TRID'-ee-um) is still about 15 years from reaching the nearest well.

The department launched an investigation Friday into the April 2009 spill and says the actions of plant owner Exelon Corp. have not been sufficient. Exelon did not immediately comment.

Tritium is found naturally in tiny amounts and is a product of nuclear fission. It has been linked to cancer if ingested, inhaled or absorbed through the skin in large amounts.

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